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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)
the 17 you're yo zone nations have agreed to give an additional loan of nearly $45 billion to greece. they say the debt reduction plan is on its way. the loan will be granted as early as next week. at a meeting last month, the euro zone nation ministers agreed in principle on aid for greece after the government carried out austerity and other measures as preconditions for additional loans. at that time they suspended the final decision on loans. they said they needed to determine if greece's bond buy-back program would be effective. at thursday's meeting they endorsed the buy back plan of the depreciated bonds. they will repurchase bonds from the private sector at a third of their face value. the ministers agreed on a separate loan of nearly $20 billion for greece by thend of next march. loans to greece were suspended for the past six months. >> today's decision on the greek package will remove the clouds that are hanging over greece. >> and the greek prime minister welcomed the decision calling it a big success for greece and a big success for europe. investors are still uncertain a
for greece's rural population. >> but first, here are some other stories making headlines. thousands of sunni muslims are continuing their protests against the iraqi government, demanding the resignation of the prime minister, accusing him of sectarian politics. that's after bodyguards of the sunni finance minister were arrested on terrorism charges last week. >> the president of the central african republic has appealed to france and the u.s. for help against a rebel coalition that has vowed to topple his government. france has declined to intervene against the rebels who have already taken several towns and are now advancing on the capital. >> heavy snow has paralyzed large parts of eastern canada. in montreal, traffic came to a virtual standstill. police are telling people to stay at home, as some areas are expected to receive almost half a year of additional snow. well, we are going to a short break. after we come back, we will look at europe's crisis year 2012. >> we will find out how it will be a year to forget for one of germany's top swimmers. stay with us. >> welcome back. in just th
. italy, spain, portugal, greece and ireland, hungry are in terrible shape. serious terrible shape. and because some folks don't pay attention to numbers, here's a chance for a statistic to help. students of mine, professors who came to the united states to study the universities where i taught. now professors at the university of acton, major universities increased. today their salaries as we speak are 40 percent less than what they were in may of 2010. try to imagine yourself in a job that you've kept in which the money you get every week is 40% less. police, fire, school teachers, social workers, you name it. .. governments in france and germany have been very frightened since they too are facing an economic crisis and they too are trying to solve it by making demands of their people to pay for something we come in to. they have chosen to use a very dangerous strategy particularly warm germany and the strategy goes like this. we the government are your friends, you the german working-class, because we are not going to allow you to be made to pay for those lazy southern european
of the u.s. government it would make us look like greece tomorrow. instead, they are in like netherland so stuff like this happens. >> we're beginning to look like greece right now. but some things have improved. prices have gone up but that is supply and demand issue. supply is way down so delinquency rights are still very high. >> this is biggest government stimulus program of all. people forget, this stimulus, five trillion bucks. the president is rallying about fat cat bay but they were exempt from dodd-frank. they basically dominate the mark 90% of the mortgage market. they've got government backing. they don't have to compete. they don't have to out perform. they make more money than the government overseer, that is doing their job. you have directors there making millions of dollars. we should have reined them in long time ago. >> there was a ignite named franklin rains, he made $90 million back during his reign and they gave out $45 million in bonuses. these organizations have a bad history. >> they got a bad history. we have always known that. they were never real based on market
with stefan pedrazzi about whether he believes there are any reasons to be optimistic about greece. >>> and whether volatility triggered by uncertainty over the fiscal cliff should be hear to stay. the fiscal cliff seems to be here to stay, at least. house speaker john boehner has scrapped the deal on plan b. boehner conceded last night he didn't have enough support from republicans to pass the bill which would raise taxes on households making more than $1 is million a year. the house is now in recess until the end of the year. the white house says the president's main priority now is to ensure taxes goes go up for 98% of americans and 97% of small businesses. for more on the tax, we're joined. talk about the cliff. you wake up to the news this morning. what do you make of it? what do you do now? >> i guess what's happening is there is more idealogical battling going on in the republican party than maybe was obvious a little while ago. our baseline view is they will strike a deal either down to the wire or early next year. growth next year will be quite weak. it has to be said that
of the u.s. government it uld make us look like greece tomorrow. instead, they are in like netherland so stuff like this happens. >> we're beginning to look like greece right now. butome things have improved. prices have gone up but that is supply and demand issue. supply is way down so delinquency rights are still very high. >> this is biggest government stimulus program of all. people forget, this stimulus, five trillion bucks. the president is rallying about fat cat bay but they were exempt from dodd-frank. they basically dominate the mark 90% of the mortgage market. they've got government backing. they don't have to compete. they don't have to out perform. they make more money than the government overseer, that is doing their job. you have directors there making millions of dollars. we should have reined them in long time ago. >> there was a ignite named franklin rains, he made $90 million back during his reign and they gave out $45 million in bonuses. these organizations have a bad history. >> they got a bad history. we have always known that. they were never real based on market fo
♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ imus in the morning ♪ >> you won't believe how bad things are in greece, but believe this, they are getting their bailout money. it came through today. good morning, everyone, 50 billion dollars flowing into greece. it will never be repaid. new figures show the country in a deep depression. 11 million people owe a half trillion dollars. back home, speaker boehner and president obama are a little closer to a deal and both have given some ground on taxes and spending. the markets like it. right now john boehner is trying to sell it to his party. across the country, record gun sales over the weekend. "varney & company" about to begin. i always wait until the last minute. can i still ship a gift in time r christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. >> we have breaking news right now on the debate within the republican party about the fiscal cliff deal. rich edson has what, what is being discussed here, what is the latest, rich? >> a plan b on
't get. see if you can do better. it wouldn't take much. >>> greece's national bank euro bank alfa and perez says they need the money following disclosures by the lenders last week. greece is concerned that the 50 billion euros set aside for bank recapitalization will be enough to cover the shortfall. >>> and the italian treasury is holding its last debt sale of the year. traders are expecting to see solid demand for the paper after rome placed nearly 12 billion euros of shorted dated paper just yesterday. still, they warn investors could become more discerning in the new year especially as the italian electric tore ral race on thursday. italy expects to raise around 10 billion euros next year. less supply. we know there's still plenty of investor demand and no sign necessarily of re-ignited concern about the longer term health of these -- you could call them peripheral economies. >> no. things have really improved. it's all still down to the ecb's pledge to support these countries if they fulfill the conditions. especially in the case of italy. the country is fulfilling conditions
with the resources at hand. -- >> the c.s. becoming like greece? >> no, that is a profoundly -- do you see as becoming like greece? >> that is a profoundly different situation. the congressional budget office says that if we stay on the course we are on, we will have a debt that is 230% of our gross domestic product of the the next 20 years. most experts say once you get a debt of more than 9% of gross domestic product, that inhibit future economic growth in a significant way. this is just about -- not just about numbers on page, it is really about opportunities for people. whether you will be able to send your kid to school, to college, whether it will be able to buy a car, my house, whether we will have economic opportunity for the people of the country. the best academic research that has been done shows that if a country's debt gets too large in relationship to the size of its economy, the economy does not grow as fast. opportunity is lost. jobs are lost. so there is a similarity with what is happening in europe and what could happen here if we don't get our house in order. >> you talk
the wires. we have quite a bit of support for the euro because of the s.a.p. upgrade on greece and the situation over there. we'll see also the way the market is reacting. let's have a quick look at what the dax is doing. it's been perky, up 0.15%. trading toward the 7,665 level. >> patricia, this comes at a time when people have been focusing on the strength of the euro. as we're over the 1.32 level you mentioned, certainly member countries would like to see a weaker currency. but as long as the surveys hold consistent with strength in the german economy, we're not likely to see that weakening. >> no. absolutely. and the more we get over the entire question will the euro break up or not, as long as that happens we will have some more support in the euro which is not bad if you think about the quantitative easing we've seen in the eurozone and also inflation. that could be the counterpart of the equation, that we still have money being pumped into the economies wheroe ouausterity is going on. we have a little pullback possibly going forward when it comes to the euro. then again
. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on
risk at the moment? we'll keep giving greece money because we can't afford not to. we're still waiting maybe for the ecb to step in. what is the till rask? anything we didn't know about? >> lots of things we don't know. that's the problem. it is the unknown unknown as they say. i think greece is probably too small to view. i think what really bothers me is spain which i think clearly bothers the whole market. the question, a growth going to fall off a cliff or whether it muddle through and a bailout will be sufficient. as you say, we don't know the answer to that question. that remains the tail risk. until we do get close to a resolution, i'm not going to turn massively bullish. >> what's your view on that? >> i think i go along very much with what he's saying. >> what is your view on what happens to spanish growth? >> i think spain has a lot of problems at the moment. it's not seeing a lot in the domestic market. not seeing it move toward an export. in which case spanish growth is going to be very, very weak for some time to come. >> all right. good to see you. thanks very much. alan
. there is no argument there as there wasn't for greece. we know the countries, italy, greece is in a crisis and it's a crisis due to lack of competitiveness. going back to the currency, under the currency they create a wave of all sorts of problems including inflation and i think it is not a good route. >> well, i do rather agree with paula on this one. the problem with the euro is it gives you easy and quick solutions. and we're going to keep developing your currency. as you go back to the old days where you keep lowering your currency and you pay relatively high rates on your debt. so the appeal of the euro in the beginning was, oh, chief debt. it looked like christmas. now we're discovering that that regime, a ten-year regime where many peripheral countries got hammered. only germany sort of really held it together. now we have to look at how to undo this. for countries who have no ambition about their future, then maybe the policy is the way to go. italy had so many things going for it that falling back, that seems almost -- >> how about the service in the g-7. >> italy is two countries. it's
reached on the banking up. it's integrity is good for the agreement and as we focus on greece today, conditions are in place to disburse the next tranche of aid to greece totalling 43 billion euros. >>> over to japan, voters are heading to the poll on sunday. the major indicators suggest a win for the opposition party. the local media says there is still a large pool of undecided japanese voters. kari enjoji has more on this report from tokyo. >> reporter: 12 parties, some less than a month ole are fielding 1,504 candidates. but instead of being slow for choice, voters say i just don't know. polls suggest the prime minister's democratic party is unraveling, hinting that many first-time politicians that swept the party to a victory three years ago could be wiped out. >> it's quite possible that the cpj will sink from neing first or second but possibly to even third parties in japanese politics. >> the dpj's handling of the fukushima disaster and undelivered economic promises have alien ated many voters. if the liberal democratic party wins, shinzo abi could with the newest restoratio
greece or italy? twenty years? i don't know. this trendline is bad. happening under bush and obama. it does not work. john: good intentions and that go bad. clean energy's. >> solyndra. the tip of the a's spurred. dozens of companies go bad. the story behind the story. campaign contributors contributors, interest free loans from the government, distorting capital, it means resources are being used less productively and workers get lower wages and it adds up to the bad situation. john: president bush says it to oklahoma you take care of things it is good for the economy. >> collor you create a housing bubble. those people were the ones that had to walk out onto the plank then we all fall into the shark infested waters 87 tax credits. >> sounds great. but from the tax code in 1913 only 14 pages we have warped into the 702000 page monster. more than 1,000 different forms to download. nobody understands. h&r block loves it but it is a news around the neck of the american economy. every page has something in it that sounds good but look what it adds up to 27 spending. the welfare state.
, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding disparate
, greece, portugal are likely to stay in recession for the whole year, i would argue there's a high probability that italy will come out of recession towards the end of the second quarter. >> and that seems to be the real concern that is in the market today, whether the political upheaval, even the campaigning by berlusconi could undo some of that progress. >> i think the key point is will the reform programs that have been initiated by the monte government, will they stay intact? i think there's a reasonable chance, they've had a more than reasonable chance that that is the case. yes, it's not surprising, we have the sell off today. it's inest knowledge that as the campaigning builds up, investors will be nervous.. the move by investors back into italian bonds over the next few months, we could see some exits. but i think if we get a sensible election results, and i think we probably will, then the reform program will be intact and the new government will stick to the budget that is going to be passed in the next two weeks. >> maybe a buying opportunity there. i won't quite put the
're the only country that does it, let's be like france, greece, and spain and not have one and get to the cliff-- >> a quick reminder, by the way, adam of the 16 trillion dollars of debt that currently is on the table for the united states. 6 billion of that debt, neil, has been put on the books under president obama's watch. >> 6 trillion. >> 6 trillion. we're talking about adding on to that. where is he he coming up with the numbers? which economist is he citing and where are the polls-- >> warren buffett said earlier in the week it's not about economics it's about making people feel good. -- let me stop a second. did you say where he does he pull these numbers out of. >> seriously, seriously. >> neil: i wanted to make sure i heard you correctly. talk about a pain in the gas. the price is record high this time of year and we're getting new proposals to hike gasoline prices to pay down the debt. where will it go. the gang from forbes is on that. that's at the top of the hour. forget having the in-laws over for dinner, more families are shacking up together. young, old and everyone
into the incident. workplace officials often fail to adequately enforce workplace safety standards. >> in greece, a bomb has exploded in an athens suburb. no one was hurt, but the explosion damaged adjacent businesses. some have called for banning the anti-immigrant party whose popularity has surged during the greek debt crisis. >> in belfast, protesters have clashed with police over plans to remove britain oppose the union jack flag from city hall. hundreds of protestant demonstrators attempted to storm the building after the majority catholic city voted to take it down. 15 police officers were injured. and these are testing times for a new push by the european union to reconcile serbia and its former southern province. >> although it has been almost five years since costs of a declared independence with western backing, tensions are just as high. still, there are optimists. we talk to the german commander of the nato-led peace keepers in the north of the country for more. >> our coverage begins. >> the bridge links the ethnic albanian and serve parts of the city appeared to this day, it is gua
government privatisation plans. and and greece, civil servants have gone on a 24-hour price against job cuts. many public services were disrupted in the capital. >>> in south korea, voters have elected their first female president, who follows in the footsteps of her father who was also president. she is vowing to batter the economy. >> she has occupied a place on the national stage since the early 20's, but this is something new. if just before midnight, in freezing temperatures in central seoul, she addressed her supporters and the nation as the first female president elect. >> i will be the people's president who keeps promises to the citizens. this is the year of happiness we have all been waiting for. >> south korea remains a male- dominated society. just half of the working age women still have a job. if some see this as a transformative moment. >> there has been a glass ceiling in this society. with a woman president, took that we will demonstrate our troop qualities. >> i admit defeat, but it is just my defeat, not not that of others who are hoping to have a new government. i congrat
and transportation workers have staged a 24-hour strike in the greek capital. strikes have become frequent in greece since public spending has been cut to meet conditions for international bailout funding. >> iraq's president has arrived for medical treatment following a stroke. few details have been released about the seriousness of his condition. he is seen as a unifying force in iraq, mediating among sunnis, shia, and kurds. >> protesters in several indian cities are calling for action to stop the increasing number of violent rapes of women, following the rape and beating of a 23-year-old by six men on a bus in new delhi. doctors say the young woman is still in critical condition. >> christmas is, of course, just around the corner, and many retailers have been targeting customers, looking for that last-minute gift. and then there is this -- how about a personal shopper when you are at the airport? >> sounds good. as it turns out in frankfurt, germany, there is one, and he is especially looking to help out an increasing number of travelers from china, who are looking to part with lots of cash. >>
, but will be a couple points worse than greece and spain. so that's a big negative for george osbourne. another one will be getting the percentage of debt compared with gdp in the country, getting that down within a five-year period, getting it syncing in the right direction. he thought it was going to peek around 75%, 75%. it looks like it could go up even further. so let's see what he says on that front today. in terms of options, he has very few options indeed because this is a government which as we know has set its fallout on plan a. and yet, are we seeing real austerity? i'm not entirely sure. government borrowing this fiscal year so far in the five months that we have figures for already is 26.7% higher than the same period a year ago. the idea originally this year was for flat spending and then getting it down there after. and he's having to borrow more and more money, october figures were around 2.6 billion pounds more in borrowing than analysts expected. having to borrow more because tax receipts and corporations are falling. the labor party -- i was speaking to rachel reeves earlier on,
to the trading day. investors are waiting for the results of greece's bond buyback program occurs. joe has some of the big corporate news and this one is actually a global corporate story. >> hsbc. we're talking about paying $1.9 billion in the money lawnering lapses. a brirchb lender admitting to a breakdown of controls, in a statement announcing a deferred payment. yesterday standard chartered agreed to pay $27 million agreeing that it violates sanctions against iran and two other international companies. >> if you're an international bank and you prael without getting into this kind of trouble? >> no. >> can you actually operate without money laundering? >> i'm just saying, if you're going to be in business in all these types of markets, isn't this going to happen? >> aren't there sxwier countries that would be probably -- that it would stead if you don't want any business tale. >> was there a fascination in this country about whether you want to indict the whole institution or what happens systemically. >> is this your sequel? >> i was on the phone last night. one of the two publishers that
or the interests of the nobles should govern the affairs of men since these questions convulsed greece and rome. he was looking back at greece and rome in the way we look back at the founding to try to figure out how much of this division, how much of the divided opinion is natural, how much is unnatural, and how do you manage and try to do what you can with what we have. and his answer, wonderfully, was in theory he would want to go back to monticello. you know those wonderful quotations, we all know them. oh, if i could only be with my books and at my farm and at my family in the peace and respite of possibility cello. well, you know, the road was open. he could have gone. new york, philadelphia, williamsburg, richmond, paris, london, hold and, i mean, he was everywhere the action was. he was irresistibly drawn to it. because as a young man he'd entered into what he called the bold and doubtful election between submission and the sword. the american revolution shaped him and grabbed him in the way few historical events, i think, have grabbed any generation or any man. i think he thought of the re
years away from being greece or italy? twenty years? i don't know. this trendline is bad. happening under bush and obama. it does not work. john: good intentions and that go bad. clean energy's. >> solyndra. the tip of the a's spurred. dozens of companies go bad. the story behind the story. campaign contributors contributors, interest free loans from the government, distorting capital, it means resources are being used less productively and workers get lower wages and it adds up to the bad situation. john: president bush says it to oklahoma you take care of things it is good for the economy. >> collor you create a housing bubble. those people were the ones that had to walk out onto the plank then we all fall into the shark infested waters 87 tax credits. >> sounds great. but from the tax code in 1913 only 14 pages we have warped into the 702000 page monster. more than 1,000 different forms to download. nobody understands. h&r block loves it but it is a news around the neck of the american economy. every page has something in it that sounds good but look what it adds up to 27 spendin
-- forays to greece were utter disasters. i would love to follow hovering behind him churchill as he goes from meeting to meeting and it is norway, then when he sells his generals on maybe the viability of going to norway or thinking about it, then he says no, no, we will go to sumatra instead. he gave them fits. host: so, you would tell all kinds of stories in here. you covered the dunkirk story. where was he, what year is dunkirk, what was it and where was he in this process? guest: the evacuation? host: yes. guest: that would be the last week of m
rather than contraction. it's been since october of last year. also abroad greece announcing it will buy back bonds through a dutch auction. the set up whether allow athenss to assess the level of demand before setting a final bryce for the deal. part of the country's efforts to cut its about a along debt. and in germany, merkel is not ruling out the possibility of notifying greece some of its debt once athens finances are in better shape. angela merkel told a german tabloid that the question of the so-called haircut can be revisited. in the past, merkel's government had ruled out forgiving any debt. >> in corporate new, ubs is reportedly close to a settlement. the "new york times" says the swiss bank is expected to pay horn $450 million over claims that some of its employees submitted false libor rates. that's pretty huge story and we will take a look and ten to see what happens with this. also morgan stanley trader is under investigation by cme regulators over trades and treasury futures four years ago. at the time he was employed by goldman sachs. he's now head of global interest rate
of ancient rome and greece were thought to ennoble the minds that contemplated them. turner recorded their beauty-- the vestiges of power in ruin, history frozen in atmospheric splendor, a lost paradise still tinged by myth. he could capture that beauty like no one else which earned the praise of his friend the painter thomas lawrence. (reader) "the subtle harmony of this atmosphere, that wraps everything in its own milky sweetness... can only be rendered, according to my belief, by the beauty of his tones." (narrator) turner first saw the seductive beauty of venice in paintings by the 18th century venetian artist canaletto, a favorite of itish collectors. turner's venice from the porch of madonna della salute was designed to appeal to that market. juliet and her nurse, on the other hand, was a breathtaking work of fiction. turner transported shakespeare's characters from verona-- and set them in the lower right-hand corner of a composition that vibrated with the decadent revels of venice at carnival time. rendered in luminous tones, figures and fireworks dissolve in the gossamer atm
of the nobles should govern the affairs of men. she was looking back to greece and rome and the founding to figure out to figure out how much of the divided opinion as natural, how much is on natural and how do you manage and try to do what you can with what we have in his answer was in theory he would want to go back to monticello. you know those wonderful quotations. we all know them. if i could only be with my books and my farm and my family and at peace and rest of monticello. well, you know the road was open, she could have gone in new york, philadelphia, richmond, paris, london, holland. he was everywhere the action was. he was irresistibly drawn to it because it has a young man he entered into what he called the board election between submission and the sword. the american revolution shaped him and grabbed him in the way that few historical defense i think have grabbed any generation or any man. i think that he thought of the revolution actually almost as an organic thing almost as a child than as an adopted or created by this group of men who would preserve it and make it and nur
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)